ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL

How did the young greek boy most likely gain his knowledge of oyster piracy

Answers

Answer 1
Answer: I think the greek boy is most likely gain his knowledge of Oyster piracy because of his interaction with Neil Partington
As the story describe, Neil's head is filled with the 'encyclopedia of oyster industry'. By being close with Neil, i think the young boy may have catch a thing or two about the issues.
Answer 2
Answer:

C. From being a pirate


Related Questions

MIDDLE SCHOOL

In the book, "Carry On", How exactly would you explain Baz's personality?

Answers

I would say very sarcastic and unpredictable but secretly sweet.
HIGH SCHOOL

Bede uses religious and even fantastical elements in his story about Caedmon. To modern-day readers these elements may seem out of place in a history. What would the effect of these references have been during the time this work was published? A) The references would have seemed out of place and detracted from the story.

B) The references would have confused Bede's readers because they had not yet converted to Christianity.

C) The references would have enhanced the tale of Caedmon's talent since religion was a part of people's everyday lives.

Answers

The references would have enhanced the tale of Caedmon's talent since religion was a part of people's everyday lives is the  the effect of these references to have been during the time this work was published. Hence, option B is correct.

What is the concept of the passage?

The story of Caedmon, also known as Ecclesiastic History, was written by Bede and is based on the first English poet. The story has several theological allusions that represent both the time period in which it was written and the time period in which the main character Caedmon lived.

The reader's experience of the story is enhanced by the environment's similarity. Due to the fact that religion was a part of people's daily life, the references would have improved the story of Caedmon's talent.

Thus, option B is correct.

For more details about concept of the passage, click here:

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The correct answer should be C) The references would have enhanced the tale of Caedmon's talent since religion was a part of people's everyday lives.

Religion was a common thing in the lives of people at that time, and since Caedmon was completely talentless, this certainly increased the power of the tale because he suddenly became the greatest poet due to divine intervention.
MIDDLE SCHOOL

In a short story, Character A is injured accidentally after a fight with Character B. In a filmed version of the story, Character A is injured because Character B attacks him without a reason. How does this change most affect the way we see Character B in the film?

Answers

It shows that he is more aggressive
MIDDLE SCHOOL

What is a person who you feel embodies the american dream ?this should be an amaerican living or dead, who is not included in this packet? '' WHAT IS THE AMERICAN DREAM?

Answers

The American Dream is a national ethos of the United States, the set of ideals in which freedom includes the opportunity and advantage for prosperity and success, as well as an upward social mobility for the family and children, achieved through hard work in a society with few barriers.

Random Questions
Read the excerpt from act 2 of A Doll's House. Rank: Let me play for her. Helmer [getting up]. Yes, do. I can correct her better then. [RANK sits down at the piano and plays. NORA dances more and more wildly. HELMER has taken up a position beside the stove, and during her dance gives her frequent instructions. She does not seem to hear him; her hair comes down and falls over her shoulders; she pays no attention to it, but goes on dancing. Enter MRS. LINDE:] Mrs. Linde: [standing as if spell-bound in the doorway] Oh!— Nora: [as she dances] Such fun, Christine! Helmer: My dear darling Nora, you are dancing as if your life depended on it. Nora: So it does. Helmer: Stop, Rank; this is sheer madness. Stop, I tell you! [RANK stops playing, and NORA suddenly stands still. HELMER goes up to her.] I could never have believed it. You have forgotten everything I taught you. Nora: [throwing away the tambourine]. There, you see. Helmer: You will want a lot of coaching. Nora: Yes, you see how much I need it. You must coach me up to the last minute. Promise me that, Torvald! Helmer: You can depend on me. Which statement best describes the dramatic irony in this passage? The audience knows that the tarantella is supposed to be wildly fast, but Helmer does not. The audience knows that Nora is intentionally failing to dance correctly, but Helmer does not. The audience knows that Helmer does not know how to dance, but Nora does not know this. The audience knows that Doctor Rank loves Nora, but Helmer does not know that he does.