BIOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL

When does cellular respiration occur? are there any situations where living cells are not respiring?

Answers

Answer 1
Answer: Cellular respiration occurs in the mitochondria, the double membrane organelle. It occurs when the cells need energy, storage molecules like glycogen are rapidly broken down from being a polysaccharide to its monomer units which undergo reactions once transported to the cells requiring energy and broken down to release its energy.

Yes, there is a situation where living cells are not respiring. For example in the microbial cell that lives in anaerobic environments in specific environments will use fermentation instead of respiration to produce ATP. The example of this is the yeast cells in beer mash.

Related Questions

HIGH SCHOOL

What is the source of energy in the water cycle?

Answers

I believe the source of energy in the water cycle is the sun, seeing as how without it nothing else would work.

for online classes: sun

COLLEGE

Your lab group is experimenting with the diffusion of molecules across a membrane. Dialysis tubing is used as a model cell membrane, because is it semi-permeable, allowing small molecules to cross the membrane, but NOT larger molecules, like starch. A starch solution is placed in the dialysis tubing and then the dialysis tubing is placed in an iodine and water solution. Iodine is used as an indicator for the presence of starch. Normally, iodine is a yellow-brown color, but in the presence of starch, it turns a deep purple. After observing the experimental setup for 20 minutes, the iodine solution remains brown, but the starch solution inside the dialysis tubing is purple and swollen. Based on what you learned from the lab, starch is MOST likely to cross the cell membrane at which of the points indicated on the diagram? A) Starch crosses the cell membrane at A. B) Starch crosses the cell membrane at B. C) Starch crosses the cell membrane at D. D) Starch crosses the cell membrane at E.

Answers

Answer:

Starch crosses the cell membrane at E.

Explanation:

i did the USATestprep

Answer:

C) Starch requires ATP energy for transport and therefore cannot cross the dialysis tubing into the iodine solution.

Explanation:

I did the USAtestprep

MIDDLE SCHOOL

example of a decomposer and explain what would happen if decomposers were absent from a forest ecosystem

Answers

If the a decomposer were absent from the forest, everything would just pile up onto one another and never be returned to the Earth. 
An example of a decomposer would be a worm. And if there was no decomposers in a forest ecosystem or any where .The simple answer would be : there would be a bunch of dead animal bodies everywhere and then the world would be covered in dead bodies. Plain and simple!
MIDDLE SCHOOL

Which occurrences do the greenhouse effect contribute to

Answers

Answer:

higher ocean levels

strange wether patterns

global warming

Explanation:

i took the quiz sry i late.

Most climate scientists agree the main cause of the current global warming trend is human expansion of the "greenhouse effect" — warming that results when the atmosphere traps heat radiating from Earth toward space. Certain gases in the atmosphere block heat from escaping.    HOPE THAT HELPS

Random Questions
Which line or lines in this editorial show faulty reasoning? Save Teenage Driving: A Call to Arms an editorial by Sophie Behrend Recently, House Representative Ken Weaver of Washington State proposed a bill (House Bill R-9687b) that would raise the legal driving age to 21. You heard me right—Congress is considering raising the driving age to 21. If you are like me, such a law would be a catastrophe and would only mean one thing: the end of life as we know it. Representative Weaver claims that his bill is motivated by "safety." He argues, “Nearly half of all accidents involve people under the age of 21." Representative Weaver also claims, "Raising the driving age would mean raising the level of safety on America's roads." But I would ask Representative Weaver: Do not "nearly half" of all accidents involve men, and would not the streets be safer, then, if male drivers were outlawed? And what about the percentage of accidents that occur on paved roads—should we do away with paved roads too? Weaver also claims that "a majority of seat belt violations" are the fault of the under-21 crowd. But let me ask you this: Do people under the age of 21 really wear their seat belts less often than older people, or are they just caught more often? That is, we know the police have their eye on the teenagers, but are they looking at the adults as well? But I can hear it now: "If teenagers are all so safe, why do they have such high accident rates?" Here's a possible answer: inexperience. Like anybody who is inexperienced, the teenage driver must suffer through a legitimate period of self-doubt and skills acquisition. Chances are, if the driving age were moved to 21, we would see 21- to 24-year-olds causing the largest percentage of safety problems—not because of a maturity problem, mind you, but just because they would be inexperienced at driving